Category Archives: Make Money Online Business Opportunities

EA Mobile Launches Tetris Blitz: 2016 Edition on Mobile

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EA Mobile launched a major content update in Tetris Blitz, transforming the game into Tetris Blitz: 2016 Edition. The redesigned application features an updated art style and user interface, as well as a new Daily Challenge system and more.

In Tetris Blitz, users are challenged to earn as many points as possible before time runs out in each game. While playing, users must drop Tetriminos into the proper positions to create lines, which clears them from the screen. A power-up system allows users to trigger special reactions as they play.

With this update, users can complete new Daily Challenges, which ask them to complete specific tasks each day. For instance, one challenge may ask players to clear 25 lines in a 60-second game. Each daily challenge can be played three times on three different difficulty levels. Users may receive coins as they successfully complete challenges, and these coins can be spent on power-ups before each game begins.

In addition, the game’s power-up system has been updated, so all power-ups can now be unlocked for free as players progress through the game’s experience point levels.

Finally, users can earn additional coins in the game’s Gold Rush bonus mode, which becomes available each time players reach new experience point levels. In this mode, users create lines with special Golden Minos, which turn into coins when they’re used in complete lines.

Tetris Blitz: 2016 Edition is available to download for free on the iTunes App Store and Google Play.

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5 Steps to Recovering from Low Landing Page Conversions

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Landing pages are intended to be simple and straightforward – a single page designed to get a specific audience to take an action.
Marketers use landing pages to get people to:

  • Make a product purchase
  • Opt-in to get a promotional product like an ebook or report
  • Request more information or a consult
  • Urge an audience to subscribe

You’d think that creating a page for such simple tasks would be easy, especially when you consider the wealth of tools at our disposal for building out landing pages.

And, in fact, the act of producing landing pages is actually not complicated – at least, until you factor in the human component of your audience.

People, the ones you want to get to take a specific action, muck up the entire process and make landing pages much more difficult.

There’s no specific way to design or configure a landing page to ensure it’s going to perform a certain way or deliver favorable conversions.

All you have is your research and whatever knowledge you may have picked up about copy and landing page best practices, so you go on intuition.

You’re not alone in that. Over 60% of marketers optimize sites based on intuition alone.

Then the testing starts. And despite everything you feel you’ve done correctly, you go through what many others experience: lackluster conversion rates.

There are a lot of changes and tweaks you can make, but don’t approach your landing page like a master control panel where you start pulling levers and pushing buttons blindly.

There are 5 key areas where you can start making small challenges to positively influence your conversion rates.

1. Trust Signals

Simply put, if you don’t have trust, then you don’t have sales. You may have been funneling traffic to your landing pages as a result of lead nurturing, but chances are you’ve got some fresh landing page traffic made up of people who have no idea who you are.

Even if you’ve been nurturing your leads via email and building a relationship, you still need strong trust signals to boost the confidence of your audience and help tip them over into a conversion.

Social proof

Social proof tells your audience that you can be trusted because other people have trusted you and made an investment of time and/or money. If you’ve got the attention and business of these other people, then you must be credible to some degree.

Some of the most common ways of adding social proof to a landing page include highlighting social shares, number of purchases, subscriber counts, or social followers.

Supplier/manufacturer affiliation

If you partner with any brand, be it a major organization or an influencer, getting their name or logo on your landing page creates an affiliation in the mind of the audience.

The audience will perceive you as more trustworthy and credible because you’re working with X brand, which must mean that X brand trusts you.

You’ll see this a lot with brand mentions that include “As seen on” logo placements.

Third-party certifications

They may not seem like much, but certifications can put a lot of people at ease, especially if you’re asking them to give you money or personal information. Using third-party certifications such as the Better Business Bureau and VeriSign create a perception of authority around your landing page and brand.

Testimonials

Testimonials are another form of social proof, and are one of the strongest trust symbols. According to Nielsen, 83% of consumers trust recommendations from people they know, and 66% trust consumer opinions posted online.

If you can, share the full details from customers, including their name and city if they’re comfortable with it. Because it’s easy to fake testimonials (and many online consumers know it) it pays to be as transparent as possible.

2. Fix Your Call to Action and Make it Obvious

Remember what I said above: your landing page has a single goal. The only way you’re going to get your audience to take action is if you make that goal 100% clear to the people landing on your page.

If you don’t have your call to action where it’s visible, above the fold, then it’s virtually impossible to direct people to take action.

The reason for this is because most people spend less than 15 seconds on any given web page, which means most won’t even bother scrolling. They’ll glance, their brain will decide whether you’re relevant or not, and they’ll bounce.

If you hide your call to action below the fold, bury it in clutter, or don’t make it stand out, then you’ll lose a considerable amount of conversions.

Eric Ries’ Lean Startup keeps the call to action above the fold and clearly visible.

Everything your audience needs to make a decision should be above the fold, but don’t necessarily try to put all of your content above the fold.

Likewise, it takes more than the placement of the call to action to make it effective. It also needs to be compelling.

Use power words

Avoid using corporate babble and industry jargon. Stick with practical language and power words that are proven to compel people to take action.

Use active language

Remember that your call to action is telling your audience to do something. Use verbs that inspire that action, such as “Join,” “Subscribe,” “Download,” etc.

Make it stand out

You want your call to action to stand out from everything else on the page, but you also want it to be consistent with the design and theme.

Tim Ferriss uses a great CTA design that clearly shows his audience where to begin.

I also want to point out the trust signals he uses on his landing page.

Use brevity

The best CTAs say the most in the fewest words, so limit them to around 90-150 characters. That’s about 5-7 words. If your call to action is too long, then you lose the hook, and if it’s too short, it may not clearly convey what step visitors should take (or why.)

Make it personal

Avoid using broad calls to action like “Start today.” Instead, personalize it to the user so it reads more like “Start your trial today.”

3. Remove the Ability to go Elsewhere

Clear navigation and links are great to use in your content marketing and on your website to help you expand on concepts and help the audience get to a destination, but they don’t belong on your landing page.

Your landing page is the destination.

You never want to give visitors the ability to click out of this endpoint in your funnel. Remove the navigation from your landing page, and avoid adding links to your content at all costs.

I also recommend adding in an exit pop-up that will appear based on user behavior, such as if the user moves their mouse toward the top of the browser. This pop-up should encourage them to stay and focus their attention on the main call to action.

4. Add Visual Engagement

If you’re getting great traffic but the conversions are low, try to incorporate visual elements as a way to improve engagement and keep the attention of your audience.

People who view video are almost 2x as likely to make a purchase, and, according to another study, the addition of video to a landing page can increase conversions by as much as 80%.

Even if you can’t create high-quality video content, you can still use relevant images to seal the deal with your audience. Include high-definition product photos, illustrations, or quality screenshots for digital services that show some behind-the-scenes product/service use.

Think like a shopper – people often want to pick up, look at, and handle a product before they purchase it. Visuals make the audience feel like they’re doing just that. This is why e-commerce sites rely on detailed and numerous product photos to help sell their goods.

5. Improve the Copy

Your copy consists of every written element on your page, especially the headlines. It should be compelling, free of errors, and written in a way that makes an emotional and psychological connection with your target audience.

It also needs to be presented in a way that’s easily scannable, with the most critical points standing out with formatting and design elements like bullets and callouts.

I can’t tell you what you should say – that’s going to be based entirely on your audience and what they need to hear, so that’s where your own research comes into play.

Test Everything You Do

Every change you make is going to have some kind of an impact on your conversions. Hopefully you’ll see a lift in conversions, but it’s possible for a change to cause them to drop.

That’s why testing is so important. There are two ways to test the work you’re doing.

A/B testing lets you pit two elements against each other so you can test one or two updates, such as a headline or call to action. Once you have a winner, you can test again or move on to another element.

Multivariate testing lets you evaluate a larger number of changes across your page at the same time, helping you find the best combination. It’s more complex to do, and many marketers prefer A/B testing over this method, but it can get you through testing a lot of changes more quickly.

If you’re getting low conversion rates, you don’t need to scrub it and start over. Make small, strategic changes to your copy and calls to action, and monitor your performance using the recommendations above. With the right approach, you should begin seeing substantial lifts in your conversion rates.

What kind of changes tend to bring you the best results with your landing pages? Share your success with me in the comments.

About the Author: Aaron Agius is an experienced search, content and social marketer. He has worked with some of the world’s largest and most recognized brands to build their online presence. See more from Aaron at Louder Online, their Blog, Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and LinkedIn.

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Facebook Audience Network Block List Added to Business Manager

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Brands and agencies using Facebook’s Business Manager now have the option of blocking their ads from running on specific applications or websites.

The social network said in its advertiser help center that the feature is rolling out gradually and may not be available to all Business Manager users yet, adding:

A block list lets you prevent your ads from running on specific sites or apps when you extend your Facebook ad campaigns to the Audience Network. You can select a block list when you choose the Audience Network placement during campaign creation.

Learn more about how to upload a block list.

Advertisers: What do you think of the new block list feature?

Thank you to Abs Elmaz of Social House Media and Chris Ruberg of OneCommand for the tips and the screenshots.

Featured image courtesy of Shutterstock.

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Facebook News Feed: Friends and Family First, Core Values

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Friends and family come first in Facebook’s News Feed, as the social network detailed the latest tweak to its algorithm and detailed the values that guide that algorithm.

Engineering director Lars Backstrom announced the algorithm update in a Newsroom post, saying that posts from friends will be ranked higher in News Feed than posts from pages. He wrote:

Our top priority is keeping you connected to the people, places and things you want to be connected to—starting with the people you are friends with on Facebook. That’s why today, we’re announcing an upcoming change to News Feed ranking to help make sure you don’t miss stories from your friends.

We’ve heard from our community that people are still worried about missing important updates from the friends they care about. For people with many connections, this is particularly important, as there are a lot of stories for them to see each day. So we are updating News Feed over the coming weeks so that the things posted by the friends you care about are higher up in your News Feed.

As for the change’s impact on pages, Backstrom wrote:

Overall, we anticipate that this update may cause reach and referral traffic to decline for some pages. The specific impact on your page’s distribution and other metrics may vary depending on the composition of your audience. For example, if a lot of your referral traffic is the result of people sharing your content and their friends liking and commenting on it, there will be less of an impact than if the majority of your traffic comes directly through page posts. We encourage pages to post things that their audiences are likely to share with their friends.

In a separate Newsroom post, vice president of product management for News Feed Adam Mosseri explained the core values that help guide adjustments to the News Feed algorithm.

Mosseri stressed that friends and family remain the top priority, and he added that News Feed should inform and entertain, not favor specific sources or ideas and remain authentic and customizable by its users.

Highlights from Mosseri’s post follow:

People expect the stories in their feed to be meaningful to them—and we have learned over time that people value stories that they consider informative. Something that one person finds informative or interesting may be different from what another person finds informative or interesting—this could be a post about a current event, a story about your favorite celebrity, a piece of local news or a recipe. We’re always working to better understand what is interesting and informative to you personally, so those stories appear higher up in your feed.

We’ve also found that people enjoy their feeds as a source of entertainment. For some people, that’s following a celebrity or athlete; for others it’s watching Live videos and sharing funny photos with their friends. We work hard to try to understand and predict what posts on Facebook you find entertaining to make sure you don’t miss out on those.

We don’t favor specific kinds of sources—or ideas. Our aim is to deliver the types of stories we’ve gotten feedback that an individual person most wants to see. We do this not only because we believe it’s the right thing but also because it’s good for our business. When people see content they are interested in, they are more likely to spend time on News Feed and enjoy their experience.

It’s important to note that while we welcome a multitude of viewpoints, we also believe strongly that people should feel—and be—safe when they use Facebook, and we therefore have community standards that define the behavior that we think is out-of-bounds on the platform. We think it’s possible to be inclusive without making Facebook a place where people are subjected to attacks, hate or other harmful behavior.

The strength of our community depends on authentic communication. The feedback we’ve gotten tells us that authentic stories are the ones that resonate most. That’s why we work hard to understand what type of stories and posts people consider genuine so we can show more of them in News Feed. And we work to understand what kinds of stories people find misleading, sensational and spammy to make sure people see those less.

Ultimately, you know what’s most meaningful to you—and that’s why we’ve developed controls so you can customize what you see. Features such as “unfollow,” “hide” and “see first” help you design your own experience, and when you use them, we take your actions as feedback to help us better understand what content is most important to you. For example, if you hide a story from someone, that signals that you’re less interested in hearing from that person in the future. As News Feed evolves, we’ll continue building easy-to-use and powerful tools to give you the most personalized experience.

We view our work as only 1 percent finished — and are dedicated to improving along the way. As we look for ways to get better, we will continue soliciting feedback. We will be as open as we can — providing explanations in News Feed FYI wherever possible and looking for opportunities to share how we work.

Readers: What are your thoughts on Facebook’s latest News Feed algorithm change?

Image courtesy of Shutterstock.

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Twitter Adds Director of Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality

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Twitter is turning to a former Apple designer to spearhead its push into virtual reality and augmented reality.

Will Mason of UploadVR reported that Alessandro Sabatelli has joined Twitter as director of VR and AR, and Sabatelli said in his LinkedIn profile that his goal is to “empower us all in the spatial computing revolution.”

While at Apple, Sabatelli helped create the iTunes music visualizer and worked on the user interfaces for iOS, iOS X and Watch OS, Mason reported, adding that after Apple, he had been working on VR and AR with IXOMOXI, which was acquired by Twitter.

Twitter acquired machine learning company Magic Pony Technology earlier this month.

Readers: What do you think Twitter has in store in terms of VR and AR?

Photo courtesy of Alessandro Sabatelli Twitter account.

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LinkedIn Display Ads Now Available Via Programmatic Buying

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LinkedIn announced Tuesday that its display ads are now available via programmatic buying, through both open and private auctions.

LinkedIn Marketing Solutions head of products Russell Glass said in a blog post that the professional network launched programmatic buying to give advertisers more flexibility, adding that LinkedIn supports the majority of demand-side platforms and agency trading desks.

Glass told Marty Swant of SocialTimes parent Adweek:

We don’t want to reinvent the wheel. We want to build table stakes capabilities into our platform in a way that highlights our differences, but is kind of what marketers have come to expect.

He wrote in the blog post:

You have the option to purchase our display ads programmatically either through an open auction or via LinkedIn private auctions. Both give you the flexibility and control to reach your target audiences on LinkedIn. If you’re already buying programmatically, open auction is the fastest way to buy LinkedIn display ads programmatically. For advertisers looking for additional targeting capabilities, the private auction is a great option.

When using your own first- or third-party data like website visitors and CRM (customer relationship management) contacts, our private auction offers the ability to explicitly target LinkedIn.com as a placement. As another benefit, our private auction purchasing option allows advertisers to target select LinkedIn audience segments (e.g., target “IT decision makers”) if you don’t want to use your own first- or third-party data.

Readers: What are your thoughts on LinkedIn’s launch of programmatic buying for its display ads?

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Glu Mobile Launches Gordon Ramsay Dash on Mobile

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Glu Mobile launched Gordon Ramsay Dash, its latest celebrity-themed mobile game. The time-management cooking game offers gameplay similar to that of Glu’s Cooking Dash 2016, as players will prepare and serve dishes to guests in each level.

In Gordon Ramsay Dash, players will progress through multiple seasons of a reality cooking show while being mentored by celebrity chef Gordon Ramsay. The game includes multiple themed restaurants, such as a burger joint and a pizza parlor. Each restaurant includes different recipes to create, with the levels in each restaurant becoming more complicated over time thanks to the addition of new recipes.

For instance, players will begin by serving things like basic burgers and turkey sandwiches in the burger joint, but this selection will expand over time to include dishes such as french fries, chili, blooming onions and more.

Each level is timed, and players will earn money as they serve guests. Users must collect the required amount of money in each stage before time runs out in order to move on to the next level. If users need help completing stages, they can craft special recipes in between levels, which each come with an associated power-up. For instance, one power may allow players to walk around restaurants faster. Each power-up lasts for a single level after they’re activated.

In addition, as players complete actions during each level, they’ll charge Gordon Ramsay’s special power bar at the bottom of the screen. When this bar is full, users can tap on Ramsay to instantly serve every guest currently waiting for a meal.

As users complete stages and earn money, they can spend this money on upgrades for their restaurants and ingredients. Restaurant upgrades may decrease prep or cooking timers, or may increase each customer’s patience so they’ll wait longer for food before they become angry and leave. Meanwhile, ingredient upgrades will make dishes worth more money when they’re served.

Some upgrades may require premium currency to purchase. Users can earn free premium currency by completing in-game achievements or by completing some stages with the maximum number of stars (the number of stars players earn on each stage is determined by the amount of money they’ve collected). Users may also be able to earn free premium currency by watching video ads.

Finally, players can compete against other users in Chef Duels to win prizes.

Niccolo de Masi, chairman and CEO of Glu Mobile, told SocialTimes:

Gordon Ramsay is a remarkably accomplished figure in both the culinary world and the entertainment industry. Having opened critically acclaimed restaurants worldwide while starring in several highly rated TV programs, we couldn’t be more excited that our partnership adds mobile gaming to his impressive business portfolio.

Gordon Ramsay Dash offers players the unique, high-stakes experience of building a restaurant empire while being mentored by chef Gordon Ramsay. I am confident that Gordon’s global and highly engaged fan base, coupled with Glu’s leadership in the time-management genre, is a recipe for success!

Gordon Ramsay Dash is available to download for free on the iTunes App Store and Google Play.

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The 7 Things Writers Need to Make a Living

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If you’re a writer, you might have heard this most of your life:

People don’t make a living writing. You should find something practical to do with your life.

Smart, capable writers grimly pass around war stories on Facebook. Penny-a-word assignments, clients who don’t pay, disdain for our craft, and disrespect for our profession.

And yet, look around at this digital world so many of us spend our lives in — it’s made of words. The technology to produce digital content exists because we create words worth sharing.

Text, video, audio — it all needs great writing if it’s going to be worth spending our time on.

If writing is your profession and your passion, you can accept crap assignments for crap money and crap treatment.

Or, you can choose something better. Because there is something better.

In the time I’ve been writing professionally, I’ve noticed some necessary traits, abilities, and strengths that make the difference between life as a well-paid writer and life as someone who likes to write but can’t seem to get paid for it.

Here are seven of the most important.

#1: Love

This might seem squishy, but if you’re meant to be a writer, you know what I mean.

There is no substitute for the love of writing. For the passion of getting the words right: the head-scratching and the pacing around the house and the endless drafts that aren’t quite right yet.

If you don’t love language and your topic and the act of putting words together, none of the rest of this really means anything.

I could have just as easily used Compulsion, Obsession, or Bullheadedness for this section. Whichever word you choose, it’s about refusing to settle for weak writing, because the words matter.

#2: An attitude of service

Writing for self-expression can be high art, pursued for the sake of your own experience of truth and beauty.

As soon as money changes hands, though, the audience — the reader, listener, or viewer — becomes the focus.

Professional writers work from an attitude of serving their audiences. Serving them with truthful, beautiful words, yes. But also with language that meets their needs, language that clarifies rather than prettifies.

Novelists, copywriters, and content marketers all live in service to our audiences. No matter how clever or perfectly poetic we may find a phrase, if it doesn’t serve the audience, it goes.

#3: Confidence

It’s always struck me as odd that many of the most capable writers are also some of the most insecure.

But it doesn’t need to be that way. Confidence comes from putting the work in to become a genuinely authoritative expert. It comes from research, craftsmanship, and seeing the difference you make to your audience.

Serious craftspeople are humble and proud at the same time.

The pride and confidence come from hours of deliberate practice — the kind of work that expands your abilities and challenges you to grow. The humility comes from the knowledge that a true pro is always improving, expanding, and refining.

#4: Training

Many writers imagine that if you have a good writing voice and a strong opinion about the serial comma, you’re qualified to work as a professional copywriter.

Not so fast.

Great copywriters and content marketers are fine wordsmiths, but they’re also strategists. They understand what types of content work to attract attention, to stand out amid the sea of content clutter, to motivate buying behavior, and to help the audience make the journey from interested bystander to loyal customer.

Solid content and copywriting strategy come from training (and practice). You can get a lot of that training right here at Copyblogger, of course.

And for writers who are serious about professionalism, we have a course designed to train you about the craft of professional content creation. (The “art” is up to your talent and abilities.)

#5: Discipline

You may be a brilliant wordsmith and master strategist, but if you don’t devote yourself to the butt-in-chair time needed to produce a significant quantity of work, you won’t get where you want to go.

To a great degree, discipline is a set of habits that can be cultivated. As a writer, you can string together rituals, create the right work environment, and adopt the behaviors of productive writers.

As a working writer, you also need to throw in a set of habits that will ensure that you meet your deadlines, keep clients updated, and invoice your clients promptly.

If you care enough, you’ll do it. The habits can be difficult to put into place, but fortunately, once they’re in place, they tend to keep you on the right track. (That’s the difference between habits and will power.)

#6: The willingness to become a marketer

There is some money in writing fiction. (For the lucky few, there’s a great deal of money. Emphasis on few.)

There’s also still a little bit of money in journalism and feature writing, especially if you have excellent contacts.

But for the most part, if you want to make a living as a writer, the fastest, most enjoyable way to do that is to write content for businesses that want to find more customers.

It’s interesting, lucrative, very much in demand, and it will get you researching and investigating as many different topics as you like.

You might think that this kind of writing is boring to do. Far from it. Creating really good content (as opposed to the mass of junk that makes up 95 percent of web copy) will call on your skills as a storyteller, investigator, wordsmith, and historian.

A well-qualified content marketer needs all the skills of a great feature or fiction writer — combined with solid marketing strategy.

You also, of course, need to get comfortable marketing yourself. This can be surprisingly tough even for writers who create superb marketing for their clients.

“Create a bunch of content and hope someone wants to do business with you” won’t work for your writing business any more than it will for your clients’. You need to apply the same strategies and frameworks to your own business that you do to theirs.

If this doesn’t come naturally to you, don’t let that worry you. It doesn’t come naturally to a lot of good writers. But it’s something that’s well within your ability to learn. And we have some resources that can help.

#7: Support

One of the tough things about living as a professional writer is that the path you walk is one you make yourself.

There’s no one to tell you which direction to go, no one to give you sign posts along the way, and no one to outline your day for you and tell you where you need to be and when.

That’s also one of the fantastic things about living as a professional writer. But sometimes Fantastic is also Difficult.

Writing is a lonely business. And it can be just a little lonelier when you don’t have colleagues to bounce questions off of or share your gripes and triumphs with.

When you do find a community of writers, though, it’s a lovely thing. They’re some of the most funny, smart, and quirky people you’ll ever meet. And it just feels good to hang out with people who get you.

(Because your friends and family actually do think you’re sort of a weirdo.)

Where to find professional writers and content marketers

If you need a talented, passionate, skilled writer with terrific knowledge of marketing strategy, our Copyblogger Certified Content Marketers are ready to help with your projects.

You can find a complete list of them here: Certified Content Marketers.

Or, are you a writer who wants to become a professional content marketer?

For you, we’d recommend participating in our Certified Content Marketer training program. It’s usually closed, but we’ll reopen it soon for a short time to invite a new group of students inside.

We’d love to see you there. Add your email below and we’ll let you know when we’re enrolling a new group of writers.

Find out when our Certified Content Marketer training program reopens:

Editor’s note: The original version of this post was published on August 30, 2014.

The post The 7 Things Writers Need to Make a Living appeared first on Copyblogger.

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Pinterest Launches Shopping Bag, Buyable Pins for Desktop

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Why go to the mall when you can just go on Pinterest? The social network Tuesday announced the launch of buyable pins on desktop, along with an all-platform shopping bag.

The new shopping bag is currently available via desktop and Android, with iOS to follow.

Pinterest also announced new partnerships for its Pinterest Shop.

Product manager Tim Weingarten provided more details in a blog post:

With your new shopping bag, you can throw in any buyable pin that catches your eye, whether you’re shopping on your Android or the web (iOS to come!). When you’re ready to check out, everything you’ve added to your bag will be right there waiting for you.

We’ve partnered with 20,000 merchants—big and small—to bring over 10 million unique products to Pinterest.

Our in-house and guest editors collect the very best of those pins in the Pinterest Shop. Stop by every day to shop the latest fashion and home trends—like Nate Berkus’ ideas for summer entertaining.

We’re also rolling out a new way to search within a pin to find products. Just tap the visual search icon at the top of any pin and explore the dots to see similar pins.

If you’re looking for something from a brand you love, head over to their profile and tap the new filtering options to find popular products, sale items and shipping deals.

Your new shopping bag lets you add items from as many different merchants as you’d like and check out whenever you’re ready.

On Pinterest, you only have to enter your checkout info once. The next time you shop, you’ll be just two taps away from placing your order.

We’ll be rolling out these new updates in the coming weeks.

Readers: What are your thoughts on these new shopping features from Pinterest?

Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, we will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, we only recommend products or services we believe will add value to our readers.

Twitter Dashboard App Launches for Businesses

Source http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/allfacebook/~3/WkaYGZ4_E9c/641622

Twitter Tuesday announced the launch of Twitter Dashboard, an iOS and desktop application aimed at helping businesses on the social network better connect with users.

Product and engineering manager Noah Pepper said in a blog post that Twitter Dashboard was created to help businesses engage with their audiences, schedule tweets and receive tips on how to foster engagement.

Pepper wrote:

  • Easily engage with your audience: Create a custom feed to find out what’s being said about your business. (Chances are there’s more than the mentions you’d normally be notified about!) Use your custom feed to get right to the tweets you want to see first and better engage with your community. For example, if you work at a cafe, you may see a tweet from a customer who has a question about your hours. Or if you’re a boutique owner, you might see a tweet from a potential customer talking about one of your products. The ability to see these tweets at a glance offers endless opportunities for you to connect with customers and potential customers with responses that add value.
  • Tweet when the time is right: Now you can schedule tweets to reach your audience when they’re online and you’re busy doing other things. If you want to edit your scheduled tweets while you’re on the go, you can use the iOS Dashboard app to update your tweet queue.
  • Get tweet ideas and inspiration: Kick-start your creative process with tweet tips geared just for businesses. They can help you start conversations and engage your audience in those moments when you’re not sure what to tweet. For example, if you work at a restaurant, a tip like, “Your team is as unique as your business. Tweet a surprising fact about one of your team members,” might remind you to share some recent recognition your chef received. Or, if you’re an interior designer, seeing, “Share the love. Like and retweet kind words from your customers,” might prompt you to retweet a customer’s excited reaction to one of your recent projects.

Readers: What are your initial impressions of Twitter Dashboard?

Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, we will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, we only recommend products or services we believe will add value to our readers.

Plarium, Skydance Partner for Terminator Genisys Mobile Game

Source http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/allfacebook/~3/ZijdemTDCqs/641586

Mobile and web-based game developer Plarium partnered with Skydance to create a mobile game based on Terminator Genisys, the latest film in the Terminator franchise, released in 2015. The “clan-based MMO strategy game” will feature content inspired by the film.

Plarium said players will begin the game as the machines “begin to wake up,” but these machines won’t have central command to control their actions. Each user will choose to become a Resistance Commander or the leader of a Skynet Command Node in the war between man and machines.

In a statement, Jesse Sisgold, chief operating officer at Skydance Media, commented:

Mobile games have incredible potential to expand the universe of characters and experiences we have created for a movie and provide audiences and fans with a brand-new perspective on our content. Plarium has had great success in creating state-of-the-art MMO titles and we look forward to working with them to bring our Terminator franchise to mobile devices in highly engaging new ways.

Plarium’s Terminator Genisys mobile game is expected to launch on iOS and Android in early 2017.

Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, we will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, we only recommend products or services we believe will add value to our readers.

Facebook Announces New, Improved Share and Save Options, Social Plugins

Source http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/allfacebook/~3/Jprr77PGksE/641605

Sharing is caring, and Facebook Tuesday introduced several improved ways for developers of applications and websites to enable their users to share (and save) to the social network.

Facebook announced in a blog post that it released Save to Facebook and Share to Facebook buttons for Google Chrome; redesigned its social plugin buttons (like, share, send, follow, recommend, save); and will offer publishers the ability to add like, comment and share buttons to the bottom of Instant Articles “in the coming weeks.”

The new Chrome buttons are available to developers via the Chrome Web Store. The Save to Facebook button enables users to save web content to a private bookmark on Facebook and view that content later, while the Share to Facebook button enables them to share content to the social network, groups and Messenger while they are outside of Facebook.

Software engineer Yue Cai wrote in the blog post:

We want to help people connect with each other through sharing the things that matter to them. Share to Facebook will give people more options to share any link on the web with their friends to Facebook, groups and Messenger.

Today, more than 300 million people use the save on Facebook feature every month. We launched the save button at F8 this year to give people the ability to also save things they discover around the rest of the web and receive notification reminders to visit their save list. People can access the things they save any time, on any device in a private, dedicated bookmark on Facebook. The Save to Facebook Chrome extension offers another easy way for people to save articles, videos, products and other interesting items while browsing the web.

Facebook said in an email to SocialTimes that its social plugin buttons were redesigned with an eye toward color consistency, a flat design and including the content’s like and share counts within the button, and Cai added in the blog post:

The like and share buttons both use the Facebook “f” logo today. Our hypothesis was that more people would understand the thumbs-up icon on the like button, so we conducted qualitative and quantitative tests to measure them side-by-side. The results revealed an increase in engagement, so we are switching the like button from the Facebook “f” logo to the thumbs-up icon.

Additionally, new versions of all our social plugin buttons are now available with the following improvements:

Finally, when the like, comment and share buttons are made available for Instant Articles, interactions with those buttons will be included in that content’s aggregate like and share counts, and Facebook users’ comments will be mirrored between Instant Articles and websites if the comments plugin is enabled.

Readers: What do you think of the improved sharing and saving tools introduced by Facebook Tuesday?

ShareToFacebookChromeExtension from SocialTimes on Vimeo.

Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, we will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, we only recommend products or services we believe will add value to our readers.

The Poor Man’s Marketing Stack: How to Hack Marketing Automation

Source http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/KISSmetrics/~3/gEEkoXMNQQk/

There are over 2,000 marketing technology companies today.

Each one doing something a bit different, filling some unique yet critical need.

That means on a daily basis, marketers might choose from 100 different software programs to fulfill relatively basic tasks.

That inspired somebody, somewhere, to misappropriate the word ‘stack’ from the development world to describe how a particular company might be aligning all their pieces of a marketing and sales pie.

The result often becomes a head-bangingly frustrating process where you’re piecing together several to deliver a single campaign.

Sure, you could opt for an all-in-one solution like HubSpot. But it’s also F&*#@*G expensive.

What if you don’t have that kind of loot?

Here’s how you can use even the most basic, inexpensive or free pieces of software to replicate sophisticated marketing automation and business process hacks.

How to Eliminate Bottlenecks with App-Connecting Tools

Marketing automation, when implemented properly, has the power to increase leads by 451% and boost sales by 34%.

But… a shockingly high 85% of B2B marketers admit to not using it correctly.

The secret ‘inbound marketing lie’ that no-one wants to admit is how F-ing time consuming this stuff is.

Not to mention, if you don’t have the right tool setup, it’s nearly impossible to pull off.

HubSpot is amazing. I’m a super happy partner and advocate. It makes marketing automation relatively easy to implement at scale. But most can’t (or won’t) fork over the ~$10k a year. That’s completely understandable.

When I started consulting, there was no way my clients or I could afford it either. (Although there is a compelling argument for making your money back relatively quickly if you’re using any all-in-one, database driven tool properly.)

That led to an endless search for tools that played well natively. Existing integrations between key pieces of software, like hooking up Gravity Forms with MailChimp, can make your life 10X easier.

But it’s difficult to construct an entire marketing funnel with only tools with native integrations. And it’s not realistic, as other departments or teams within your organization will probably have their own tools that need to work seamlessly with yours.

Fortunately, tools like Zapier and IFTTT (If This Then That) began popping up to help solve this problem.

They’re pretty basic once you get the hang of it. Simply connect two applications, create a ‘trigger’ (the thing that starts this process in motion) and an ‘action’ (what happens when the trigger is, well, triggered).

For example, Gravity Forms (an excellent WordPress plugin) can then automatically send new form submissions to your favorite CRM like Contactually — even though there’s not native integration between these two applications.

Best of all, with a little ingenuity, you can use them to re-create a marketing stack and begin automating your marketing.

We’re going to walk through examples in a minute, but first the theory.

Get Started by Outlining Your Marketing Funnel Steps

In an ideal world, strangers find out who you are and develop interest and trust in your brand before agreeing to become a customer.

Digital marketing 101 talks about creating a seamless customer experience by creating tactics that align with each stage of the buyer’s journey:

  • Awareness: A stranger becomes aware of some problem in their life.
  • Information: They begin looking for ways to help solve said problem.
  • Evaluation: Recognizing a need, they begin actively searching for a solution between different alternatives.
  • Decision: They make the conscious decision to move forward with the alternative that best meets their criteria.

Sophisticated tools can help you hit all of these points without ever switching around. But that’s gonna be tough with inexpensive software that typically specializes in one small area or another.

So instead, the goal is to recreate what these other platforms can do, moving people logically from one step to the next when they’re ready. Ideally, in the most automated and simplistic fashion possible.

The goal is to recreate what HubSpot and other sophisticated (read: expensive) marketing automation software does, for a fraction of the price.

Sounds nice in theory, right?

But practically, how would that look?

  • Awareness: A new lead converts on a landing page, getting added to your email marketing software.
  • Information: As the lead begins searching for more information on your site and interacting with other resources, they should be added and removed from other automated marketing sequences to continue nurturing.
  • Evaluation: Once the lead begins getting serious about considering you as a solution, they need to be updated in your CRM system as such and qualified (if appropriate).
  • Purchase: If they decide to move forward with you, things need to be paid, they need to become a customer or client, and their project or account needs to be set-up immediately.

The important thing to note here isn’t the tools themselves, but your process or workflow. Once that’s defined, you can figure out which tools might be best to slot in each category. For example, even the free Google Contacts might be a good CRM choice (and it integrates easily with Zapier).

Enough small talk though.

Let’s take a look at each stage of this funnel to see how you can use Zapier to recreate steps that typically only expensive marketing automation platforms deliver.

Awareness: Landing Page to Email Marketing

Rule #1 of Permission Marketing (which pre-dated Inbound Marketing by, oh, like a decade) is to get somebody to give you their info in exchange for something of value, allowing you to continue following up with that person over time.

This can be old school, like an email address. Or new school, like their Snapchat… um, err… I have no idea what these kids call it.

In any event, the process is the same.

We already spoke about Gravity Forms, which can be used to power basic eBook forms to collect submissions.

But how about something a little more complex, like a webinar?

Zapier integrates easily with GoToWebinar, allowing you to capture new registrations (and even new attendees).

This is perfect if you’d like to add these new registrations to an email list.

Even better, is if you create an automated workflow in for a specific email list for the upcoming webinar. That way, you can continually send out new messages to the contact to make sure that they attend the event (thereby boosting your Attendance Rate).

MailChimp is perfect for this. The pricing is very affordable, especially considering the beautiful templates, ease-of-use, and pretty decent automation options. Plus, that damn Chimp is so cute.

Simply select the upcoming webinar, add the new registration to a specific list in MailChimp, and you’re done.

Easy peasy.

But… what happens if people DO (or DON’T) show up? What happens if they DO (or DON’T) take you up on that customary end-of-webinar call-to-action?

You gotta update their status.

Information: Email Marketing Updates

Let’s say that you’re getting clever now, and that you’d like to create two different sets of messages based on if people did or didn’t attend your webinar.

Obviously, getting this right is important because if somebody receives the wrong email it could damage your credibility.

There are a few ways to do this, but the most straightforward is to simply create two additional lists in your email marketing service — one for those who do show up, and one for those who don’t.

THEN, you’ll want to unsubscribe people from the initial list (like the original webinar registration one) and add them to one of the new lists you created based on their actions.

Most basic email marketing services don’t have this feature already. However you can create a simple Zap to take care of it for you.

Another example where this comes in handy is if you offer a free trial or demo.

In that case, you don’t want a new lead (or even customer) to continue receiving promotional messages. Fortunately this same simple little hack, creating different lists for different segments of people, being unsubscribed automatically when they join a new list, can take care of a lot of the headache.

Evaluation: New Lead to CRM to Qualify (or Disqualify)

So far you’ve been nurturing this new lead with a few different campaigns or tactics. Everything’s gone well so far and they’re ready to get serious.

For product or software companies this is straightforward and easy: they download the discount or join the free trial and either purchase (or not).

However it’s a little more complicated for service companies.

How do you know if the lead is any good? You can’t just agree to speak with everyone nutjob who fills out your form (and there will be plenty, believe me).

You can start by filtering your results, setting up qualifying questions in your forms to make sure that you’re tailoring your follow-up process accordingly.

For example, you can set-up different zaps between products based on how people answer a specific question.

Now you can begin segmenting the people who ARE interested in your services, with the tire kickers who are primarily interested in wasting your time.

But you still have no idea if they’re even a good lead or not.

To be on the safe side, let’s automatically send an email to someone in your company to qualify each new prospect who’s interested in your services.

Simple! Just use Gmail based on the form filtered submission you just set-up. You can even pre-craft the message, pulling in form data, along with helpful links for the person who’s helping you to know exactly how you want them to be qualified (delegation FTW!).

You can send this email to an assistant, employee, or whomever, and at the same time create a new project management task to make sure they’ll see it immediately as it comes in (along with a due date to make sure each lead is followed up with ASAP).

With a few simple steps and some foresight, you’ve just set-up and delegated the first few steps of your sales process.

Congrats!

But you’re still not quite done yet. What happens when those people decide to pay you money?

Decision: New Client to Point of Sale and Project Management

Again, product or software transactions are insanely straightforward.

When someone wants to become a customer, they whip out a credit card and it takes a few seconds. Then you can update your email or contact lists accordingly with the previous tips.

However what if this is a larger transaction?

First, you can automatically create a new Freshbooks invoice when someone fills out an appropriate form. You can even have someone fill this out internally while on the phone with a new client-in-waiting.

Freshbooks already integrates with both Stripe and PayPal (along with a few others), so you can even take this a step further by automating all of the tasks related to onboarding new clients too.

For example, let’s create a new Dropbox folder for each client when a successful first payment is made.

Pretty helpful. But let’s keep going.

Let’s also create a new TEMPLATED project in your favorite project management tool (like Asana in this case).

Just like we did earlier with the email message to qualify a new lead, you can select a pre-built template for the new client to get everything set-up in seconds (rather than hours).

Best of all, there’s no shortage of tips or tricks here. If you take notes during your Kick-Off Call with Evernote, a task can immediately be created in your PM tool to make sure these notes are added to the client’s project accordingly.

A Time-Saving Caveat

Tools like Zapier or IFTTT open up a brand new world of possibilities.

It’s super interesting and you can geek out on this stuff for HOURS if you’re not careful.

Just think about all of the possibilities you can accomplish if even the most basic software options like Gravity Forms and MailChimp can do this stuff.

But don’t start with the tools.

Instead, start with the process. What exactly are you trying to accomplish? How should people move seamlessly through your own marketing funnel?

Begin by setting up the basic stuff and testing as you go. Once you’ve got the process down, it’s easy to dive into the details and begin customizing each little aspect.

For example, just start by automating how each new lead is followed up with. Then you can get clever with implementing different marketing campaigns that funnel down to this step.

Not only with this approach save you tons of time on the front-end, but you’ll drastically increase your odds of this system delivering better results too.

About the Author: Brad Smith is a founding partner at Codeless Interactive, a digital agency specializing in creating personalized customer experiences. Brad’s blog also features more marketing thoughts, opinions and the occasional insight.

Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, we will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, we only recommend products or services we believe will add value to our readers.

Marvel Mobile Games Celebrate 75th Anniversary of Captain America

Source http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/allfacebook/~3/R0t7OSk8WMc/641571

Beginning June 30, a variety of Marvel mobile games will be updated with new Captain America-themed content in celebration of the 75th anniversary of Marvel’s First Avenger. Gamers will be able to participate in limited-time events in each game to unlock new versions of Captain America for their games.

Here’s a look at some of these game updates.

Marvel Contest of Champions (Free on iOS, Android): This fighting game from Kabam will be updated with a “Civil Warrior” event, which will include a new storyline. The story will feature an alternate Earth, where the civil war between Captain America and Iron Man resulted in the death of Iron Man. Faced with the guilt of killing his former ally, Captain America has become the Civil Warrior, and has set out to stop this war from happening again.

Marvel Future Fight (Free on iOS, Android): This role-playing game from Netmarble Games will be updated with a Sharon Rogers event, including a new storyline. The storyline features an alternate universe, in which Captain America was never frozen at the end of World War II. Instead, Rogers married Agent Peggy Carter and had a daughter, Sharon. Now, Sharon Rogers has taken over her father’s legacy and battles evil forces as Captain America.

Marvel Puzzle Quest (Free on iOS, Android): In this match-three puzzle battle game from D3 Go, players will be shown a world where Steve Rogers was assassinated before he could become Captain America. In this world, Peggy Carter joined the Super Soldier Program in his place, and now fights evil as Captain America.

Marvel Avengers Academy (Free on iOS, Android): In this city-building game from TinyCo, Captain America will receive his classic uniform, and will attempt to help other members of the Avengers Academy train for battle.

Marvel: Avengers Alliance 2 (Free on iOS, Android, Amazon, Windows Phone): This turn-based battle game from Disney Interactive will be updated with a Captain America 1901 event. The storyline of this event will take place in an alternate timeline, in which Jeremiah Rogers, also known as Captain America 1901, rode with Theodore Roosevelt‘s Rough Riders during the Spanish-American War.

In a statement, Bill Rosemann, Marvel Games creative director, commented:

The unique stories and styles of each Marvel game provide an opportunity for every title to introduce a boldly imaginative version of the legendary Super Soldier. Because our partners enjoy the freedom to craft different storylines for players, fans will see how each game’s new version of Captain America is sharply distinct from one another but still completely authentic to the “Living Legend” we all know and love.

Readers: What do you think of these new game updates?

Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, we will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, we only recommend products or services we believe will add value to our readers.

Marvel Mobile Games Celebrates 75th Anniversary of Captain America

Source http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/allfacebook/~3/R0t7OSk8WMc/641571

Beginning June 30, a variety of Marvel mobile games will be updated with new Captain America-themed content in celebration of the 75th anniversary of Marvel’s First Avenger. Gamers will be able to participate in limited-time events in each game to unlock new versions of Captain America for their games.

Here’s a look at some of these game updates.

Marvel Contest of Champions (Free on iOS, Android): This fighting game from Kabam will be updated with a “Civil Warrior” event, which will include a new storyline. The story will feature an alternate Earth, where the civil war between Captain America and Iron Man resulted in the death of Iron Man. Faced with the guilt of killing his former ally, Captain America has become the Civil Warrior, and has set out to stop this war from happening again.

Marvel Future Fight (Free on iOS, Android): This role-playing game from Netmarble Games will be updated with a Sharon Rogers event, including a new storyline. The storyline features an alternate universe, in which Captain America was never frozen at the end of World War II. Instead, Rogers married Agent Peggy Carter and had a daughter, Sharon. Now, Sharon Rogers has taken over her father’s legacy and battles evil forces as Captain America.

Marvel Puzzle Quest (Free on iOS, Android): In this match-three puzzle battle game from D3 Go, players will be shown a world where Steve Rogers was assassinated before he could become Captain America. In this world, Peggy Carter joined the Super Soldier Program in his place, and now fights evil as Captain America.

Marvel Avengers Academy (Free on iOS, Android): In this city-building game from TinyCo, Captain America will receive his classic uniform, and will attempt to help other members of the Avengers Academy train for battle.

Marvel: Avengers Alliance 2 (Free on iOS, Android, Amazon, Windows Phone): This turn-based battle game from Disney Interactive will be updated with a Captain America 1901 event. The storyline of this event will take place in an alternate timeline, in which Jeremiah Rogers, also known as Captain America 1901, rode with Theodore Roosevelt‘s Rough Riders during the Spanish-American War.

In a statement, Bill Rosemann, Marvel Games creative director, commented:

The unique stories and styles of each Marvel game provide an opportunity for every title to introduce a boldly imaginative version of the legendary Super Soldier. Because our partners enjoy the freedom to craft different storylines for players, fans will see how each game’s new version of Captain America is sharply distinct from one another but still completely authentic to the “Living Legend” we all know and love.

Readers: What do you think of these new game updates?

Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, we will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, we only recommend products or services we believe will add value to our readers.

How Publishers Created Interactive Content Around Brexit

Source http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/allfacebook/~3/p5Cj8RLnJP4/641587

With the uproar over last week’s EU Referendum, in which the U.K. opted to leave the European Union, lots has happened: Donald Trump released yet another controversial tweet, U.K. Prime Minister David Cameron tendered his resignation, Scotland threatened to make another bid for independence and other countries have threatened to leave the EU.

Publishers worldwide have covered the topic from nearly every angle, thus creating another story in itself: Outlets rely on nontraditional formats to win the public’s attention in an overwhelming sea of information and content. There is no surprise there, considering the fact that a recent study found that interactive content formats demand more attention than non-interactive ones.

In the midst of such a controversial topic that seized worldwide attention and triggered strong emotional responses, these five publishers understood that it was necessary to speak with their readers, not at them.

Fortune asked its audience via a poll: “Should it Brexit or Bremain?” The item, published before the vote, presented a list of pre-referendum arguments and asked readers to read through, and then come to their own conclusion before casting their vote. Interestingly enough, the results differed from those of the real vote, showing that the majority of those who interacted with the poll voted to remain in the EU.

The Telegraph opted for a swiper format to gauge its audience’s take on the topic. This item made it easy for readers to cast their opinion, on which speakers performed well during BBC’s Brexit-focused debate, resulting in 184,000 views.

Lifestyle and fitness publication Men’s Health used a trivia quiz to apply a health-conscious approach to the matter. In an item asking, “Is the EU Good for Your Health?,” the editorial team successfully educated its readers about the EU’s influence on day-to-day wellbeing concerns.

U.K. publication The Tab chose to take the humoristic route, asking their audience, “What’s Your Brexit Strategy?.” The outlet employed a personality quiz that included light-hearted questions such as, “How long would you survive in the wild?,” and results such as, “Live on a fishing boat in the North Sea.” The humor reflected the mood of the nation and impressed The Tab’s readers, garnering an 89 percent completion rate and an average of 2.5 minutes spent on page.

Last but not least, The Huffington Post employed a chat-like format to break down the untruths contained within a flyer campaigning to leave the EU. The conversation, which took a comedic approach similar to that of The Tab’s item, pinned reason and sanity against a right-wing party in the U.K. to point out the hilarity of the document.

The above showcases that pairing good content with the right medium– in this case a format–is the catalyst for compelling content readers crave. Outlets that opt to employ interactive content formats and transform their sites into platforms in which readers can voice their opinions will undoubtedly earn the vote of their audiences.

Jo Barrow is the head of content for the U.K. at Playbuzz. She can be reached at Jo@playbuzz.com.

Image courtesy of Shutterstock.

Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, we will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, we only recommend products or services we believe will add value to our readers.

New ways to shop with Pinterest

Source https://blog.pinterest.com/en/new-ways-shop-pinterest

Last year, we gave you a way to buy things you find on Pinterest right from your phone. Today, we’re rolling out buyable Pins on web and adding a new shopping bag so you can shop for multiple items wherever you are.

Here are just some of the things that make shopping with Pinterest unique:

Take your new shopping bag anywhere

Tim Weingarten

    Internet Marketing Products

  • CPA Method Core SPECIAL 14 Year Old kid cracks into a new internet marketing goldmine and banks daily from the travel industry. Find out how...
  • Affiliate Tools HQ Membership Site A Membership Site For Online Marketers Who Are Serious About Making Money Online. Developed By Respected Online Marketers, Paula And Wanda, From Affiliate Blog Online.
Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, we will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, we only recommend products or services we believe will add value to our readers.

The Real Winner of the Brexit Vote: Interactive Content

Source http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/allfacebook/~3/p5Cj8RLnJP4/641587

With the uproar over last week’s EU Referendum, in which the U.K. opted to leave the European Union, lots has happened: Donald Trump released yet another controversial tweet, U.K. Prime Minister David Cameron tendered his resignation, Scotland threatened to make another bid for independence and other countries have threatened to leave the EU.

Publishers worldwide have covered the topic from nearly every angle, thus creating another story in itself: Outlets rely on nontraditional formats to win the public’s attention in an overwhelming sea of information and content. There is no surprise there, considering the fact that a recent study found that interactive content formats demand more attention than non-interactive ones.

In the midst of such a controversial topic that seized worldwide attention and triggered strong emotional responses, these five publishers understood that it was necessary to speak with their readers, not at them.

Fortune asked its audience via a poll: “Should it Brexit or Bremain?” The item, published before the vote, presented a list of pre-referendum arguments and asked readers to read through, and then come to their own conclusion before casting their vote. Interestingly enough, the results differed from those of the real vote, showing that the majority of those who interacted with the poll voted to remain in the EU.

The Telegraph opted for a swiper format to gauge its audience’s take on the topic. This item made it easy for readers to cast their opinion, on which speakers performed well during BBC’s Brexit-focused debate, resulting in 184,000 views.

Lifestyle and fitness publication Men’s Health used a trivia quiz to apply a health-conscious approach to the matter. In an item asking, “Is the EU Good for Your Health?,” the editorial team successfully educated its readers about the EU’s influence on day-to-day wellbeing concerns.

U.K. publication The Tab chose to take the humoristic route, asking their audience, “What’s Your Brexit Strategy?.” The outlet employed a personality quiz that included light-hearted questions such as, “How long would you survive in the wild?,” and results such as, “Live on a fishing boat in the North Sea.” The humor reflected the mood of the nation and impressed The Tab’s readers, garnering an 89 percent completion rate and an average of 2.5 minutes spent on page.

Last but not least, The Huffington Post employed a chat-like format to break down the untruths contained within a flyer campaigning to leave the EU. The conversation, which took a comedic approach similar to that of The Tab’s item, pinned reason and sanity against a right-wing party in the U.K. to point out the hilarity of the document.

The above showcases that pairing good content with the right medium– in this case a format–is the catalyst for compelling content readers crave. Outlets that opt to employ interactive content formats and transform their sites into platforms in which readers can voice their opinions will undoubtedly earn the vote of their audiences.

Jo Barrow is the head of content for the U.K. at Playbuzz. She can be reached at Jo@playbuzz.com.

Image courtesy of Shutterstock.

Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, we will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, we only recommend products or services we believe will add value to our readers.

Adult Swim Premieres Animated Sketch Show via Vine

Source http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/allfacebook/~3/2Ji13ZUKsaE/641572

Cable network Adult Swim is taking advantage of Twitter’s recent announcement that select publishers can now post videos up to 10 minutes long via Vine.

Animated sketch show Harg Nallin’ Sclopio Peepio from Brad Neely will debut on Adult Swim Sunday, July 10, but Vine users don’t have to wait, as the first episode is available here.

Readers: What are your thoughts on longer Vine videos?

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How to Analyze Your PPC Lead Data (With 15 Mini Case Studies)

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Copa América Centenario 2016 on Instagram, Twitter

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Chile defeated Argentina on penalty kicks Sunday to win Copa América Centenario 2016, and the entire tournament generated more than 231 million interactions on Instagram from June 3 through 26, from over 40 million users.

Instagram said in an email to SocialTimes that the number of users interacting was up 33 percent compared with 2015 Copa América Chile, adding that total interactions were up 25 percent from last year’s tournament.

According to Instagram, the most engaged players during Copa América Centenario 2016 were:

  1. James Rodriguez
  2. Dani Alves
  3. Leo Messi
  4. Arturo Vidal
  5. Angel Di Maria
  6. Sergio Leonel Agüero
  7. Alexis Sanchez
  8. Juan Cuadrado
  9. Gary Medel
  10. Ezequiel Lavezzi

The players with the largest growth in followers during the tournament were:

  1. Messi, 2 million
  2. Rodriguez, 911,000
  3. Luis Suárez, 631,000
  4. Di Maria, 335,000
  5. Gonzalo Higuaín, 264,000
  6. Javier Mascherano, 252,000
  7. Alves, 251,000
  8. Agüero, 238,000
  9. David Ospina, 217,000
  10. Sanchez, 213,000

The top hashtags of Copa América Centenario 2016 were:

  1. #copaamerica
  2. #copaamericacentenario
  3. #fifa
  4. #soccer
  5. #messi
  6. #futbol
  7. #argentina
  8. #colombia
  9. #copaamerica2016
  10. #copa100

The most-used emojis during the tournament were:

This photo drew the most likes, more than 2 million:

A photo posted by Leo Messi (@leomessi) on Jun 10, 2016 at 10:33pm PDT

And this photo was tops in the last 24 hours of the event, with more than 308,000 likes:

As for videos, this one was tops, with more than 4.4 million views:

Miguel Layún (@miguel_layun) has provided a valuable spark to the Mexican national team (@miseleccionmx) in the Copa America Centenario. “It means a lot to be part of the national team,” Miguel says. “This is the dream of everyone who plays football. Playing for my country in a tournament like this makes it even better.” With a draw against Venezuela in their most recent match, Mexico has advanced to the quarterfinals and have not been beaten in 22 straight competitions. Miguel, who became a father last year, says his son is his biggest motivator. “Being a dad makes me feel like I have to do my best even more than ever,” he says. “Now, I have the eyes of my child looking at me, and I want to be a good example for him!” Video by @miguel_layun

A video posted by Instagram (@instagram) on Jun 16, 2016 at 5:11pm PDT

Meanwhile, Twitter said the most mentioned players during the tournament, from June 3 through 26, were:

  1. Messi
  2. Higuaín
  3. Mascherano
  4. Di Maria
  5. Rodríguez

And the five most-mentioned teams were:

  1. Argentina
  2. Chile
  3. Colombia
  4. Brazil
  5. Venezuela

The three matches that generated the most tweets were:

  1. Argentina vs. Chile (final match)
  2. U.S. vs. Argentina (semifinal)
  3. Argentina vs. Panama (group stage)

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Which Universities Do People Like, Dislike Most on Twitter?

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Twitter has become a platform for breaking news and live broadcast second-screen engagement. It’s also become a place where people express both their satisfaction and discontent with all sorts of things. Among the discussion topics is which colleges and universities provide the best experience and education, and this social media sentiment is not available on college websites.

College Stats, a website that helps students find the best institutes of higher learning, analyzed more than 103,000 tweets mentioning the handles of various universities to find out how positive or negative the social sentiment was.

Villanova University, Syracuse University and Temple University had the most positive sentiment overall, while posts about Washington University in St. Louis, Bowdoin College and Lehigh University include the most negative words per tweet.

On the positive side, the more popular universities on Twitter might be happy to be associated with words like “recommend,” “great,” “love,” “work” and “happy.” The tweets with negative sentiment were most often complaints and included words such as “break,” “bad” and “cancer,” along with certain expletives, and concerning words like “pain,” “killed,” “shame” and “die.”

According to the report, the sentiment of the @mention tweets can be an indication of campus atmosphere. Perhaps even more important is how universities respond to social media complaints and use social sentiment to create better experiences.

Check out the report to see which universities were just middle of the road according to Twitter and to see more charts.

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7 Steps for Mastering Your B2B Social Selling Efforts

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Skeptics have been known to argue against the effectiveness of social media for selling, with some going as far as calling all social signals vanity metrics. Research, however, has shown otherwise. In almost every way, the statistics show that the salesperson who has mastered social selling is always going to outperform the salesperson who doesn’t use social media.

According to a study by Social Centered Selling, 72.6 percent of salespeople who use social media as a core part of their sales process outperform those who don’t use social media. Salespeople who use social media are also 23 percent more likely to exceed their sales quotas by more than 10 percent. This makes sense considering the fact that 74 percent of buyers consult social media before making a purchase decision.

The major challenge among business-to-business brands, then, isn’t to be on social media—more than 90 percent of brands already are–but to turn their social media presence into sales engines. With almost 1.7 billion Facebook users and billions more on other social media platforms, there’s ample audience to tap into. How do you get them to buy, though? Here are some tips:

Control the narrative outside of your channels

Many B2B marketers believe that every lead that reaches out is necessarily ready to hear from a sales rep. The truth is that B2B buyers complete 57 percent of the purchase decision before they are willing to talk to a salesperson. What’s more, 77 percent of buyers did not talk with a salesperson until after performing independent research.

In essence, today’s self-service lead nurturing means that prospects are going to learn all about you and your products without ever directly connecting with you, so limiting your brand messaging to just your owned marketing channels is a big no-no. Use techniques like content marketing to position yourself as an industry leader in such a way that you’re noticed both inside and outside of your channels, making the decision to do business with you that much easier. Tools like Marin Software make cross-channel promotion easy, so you can amplify your content with ads on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook from one dashboard.

Make yourself known

92 percent of buyers delete messages from people they do not know. Besides being active on social media, it is more important to be known in your industry. Develop a presence on your niche’s biggest platforms and publications, post regularly with the goal of increasing awareness for your brand and make yourself known through partnerships with major brands and individuals in your industry.

You may do well to try using a content curation tool like Flipboard, which is great for social media distribution, as well, so you can establish yourself as an in-the-know industry thought leader. This won’t just help your social influence–it will also have a lasting impact on your sales.

Track results from your social selling efforts

Just as it is important to have a social selling strategy, it is equally important to know when something is working and when it is not. A major challenge B2B brands have with social selling is that they have no idea whether their social selling approach is effective. A recent study by Simply Measured found that a whopping 60 percent of companies do not know whether their social media marketing efforts are working or not.

It can be difficult correlating random Facebook referrals with their activity on your site, and that’s one area where tracking technology is still evolving. Apps like Leadfeeder are changing the game in this regard, though, making it easy to track which pages your anonymous site visitors load, and also providing data on the organizations that your visitors come from. When you’re able to see what content about you interests your sales leads most, you can increase the effectiveness of your messaging.

Develop a social selling strategy

Research by the Sales Management Association indicates that two-thirds of companies have no social media strategy for their sales organizations. This is further buttressed by an Accenture study that found that 93 percent of sales executives have no formal training about social selling.

Social selling is about more than just setting up accounts on Facebook, Twitter and other networks and then posting links there on a regular basis. You need to have a clear idea of what you’re doing, and this starts with developing a strategy and ensuring that the people who will implement your strategy are qualified to do so.

Leverage the virality of social media

By its very nature, social media fuels virality, and this is one of the key principles you can use to boost sales from social media. An Edelman study revealed that 84 percent of B2B decision makers begin their buying process with a referral. People keep up with a wide variety of contacts in their networks via social media, so using aspects of your product itself to trigger peer-to-peer sharing can make a whole lot of difference.

Perhaps the most notable beneficiary of the built-in virality of social media is Dropbox. By tapping into the power of peer recommendation referrals, Dropbox was able to get to 1 million users in seven months of launching publicly, and then to 10 million users one year later. Ensure that your brand enables and encourage referrals, and whenever possible, incentivize this process.

Always reply quickly

Social media is more alluring as a sales platform due to how instantaneous response over there can be. According to one study, 78 percent of people recognize that companies’ posts on social media impact their purchase decisions. Most important, though, a good portion of these people expect near-instant response when they reach out to you. Apparently, 53 percent of consumers expect to hear back from brands within one hour of reaching out on social media.

You only have one chance to make a good impression before your prospect moves on. There’s no doubt that social media influences consumers’ purchases, but your timeliness in responding to user queries will go a great length to make or break your success with social selling.

Tap into the power of many channels and touches

It has been observed that seven out of 10 sales are completed on the fourth to tenth interaction. Real social selling is a multiplatform discipline, and it involves multiple interactions.

Besides ensuring that you are active on every social platform that your target audience uses, it is also important to ensure that you’re constantly interacting there; HubSpot’s data shows that B2B companies that blogged more than 11 times per month had thrice the traffic and almost four times the leads compared with companies that blogged less than three times per month. The same has been observed for activity on social media, where more activity generally correlates with more engagement.

Obviously, social media influences B2B sales processes to a great extent. Actually closing deals, however, requires careful understanding of how social selling works. Hopefully, the above tips will help take your social selling skills to the next level.

Harald Merckel is a freelance writer whose primary focuses are business, e-gaming and marketing.

Image courtesy of Shutterstock.

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3 Cs that Reveal the Quality of Your Blog Post

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If you’ve ever had the pleasure of purchasing a diamond, you’re probably familiar with the four Cs that determine its value: Cut, Clarity, Color, and Carat.

As the Editor of a national online publication, I’m faced with the task of assessing the “value” of articles that are submitted to me every day.

The value of an article depends on its ability to resonate with readers.

Any editor will tell you that predicting what will strike a chord with an audience is an inexact science. But, over the years, I’ve developed my own system of three Cs that help me effectively evaluate the quality of an article.

I check for:

  1. Clarity
  2. Continuity
  3. Connection

And the beauty is, you can also use the three Cs to decide whether or not your work is ready to be published.

Let’s break down how to use each of these factors when reviewing your own writing.

1. Clarity

Sometimes I read an article and can’t pin down exactly what the writer is trying to say. What idea is he trying to communicate? If it’s not clear, the writer hasn’t spent enough time creating a precise message.

Similarly, a writer may begin an article with one idea and then veer off on a related, but separate, tangent halfway through the text. We’ve all done it — even me.

For instance, my last post on Copyblogger was about getting comfortable with throwing away your words. In the first draft of that post, I also covered self-editing. Those two ideas are related, but the introduction of that additional idea weakened my main message. In my second draft, I deleted everything related to self-editing to bring clarity back to my primary message.

After you’ve written a first draft, here’s a three-step process for bringing clarity to a piece of writing:

  1. Communicate one big idea. If your article contains two big ideas, save the second one for another piece of content.
  2. Craft a magnetic headline. Your headline must make a strong promise based on your one big idea. If it doesn’t show how a reader will benefit from the article, rewrite it.
  3. Cut extra text. Eliminate every word in your article that does not deliver on the promise made in your headline.

Once you’ve brought clarity to your article, you can move on to the next C.

2. Continuity

This C improves the structure of your article. Now that your headline makes a strong promise and you know the big idea you’re trying to communicate, it’s time to ensure your article takes the reader on a logical journey.

Here are three elements that promote continuity:

  1. State your premise. For example, the premise of this article is that it’s helpful to have a framework to evaluate the quality of your content before it’s published.
  2. Introduce and support your big idea. The big idea here is that measuring Clarity, Continuity, and Connection will help you create high-quality content. Use subheads and bullet points to reinforce your message.
  3. Give readers a payoff. Highlight how the big idea will make their lives better and motivate them to take action now.

In short, your blog post needs to be structured in a way that naturally leads the reader to your desired conclusions and delivers a genuine payoff for them: a big “aha” moment.

3. Connection

This final C is the key to creating an article that readers will be inclined to share. It doesn’t matter how clear your ideas are, how well-structured your article is, or even how informative it might be … if your readers don’t connect with it, they won’t feel compelled to pass it on.

The fastest path to connection is showing vulnerability. The easiest way to get vulnerable? Share a story. It doesn’t need to be long, but the story must be honest — just like my confession above about the mistake I made when writing the first draft of my last Copyblogger post.

Speaking of that post, I told a longer story in that article about getting critiqued by a writing teacher who told me my work was completely vanilla. That made it very easy for readers to feel connected to me because we’ve all had a cringe-worthy experience like that, right?

Use the 3 Cs to transform the quality of your content

The three Cs remind you to remain audience-focused when creating content, and you can use them when you write content for clients as well as when you’re promoting your own business.

They’ll help you produce useful content readers will engage with and share.

What techniques do you use to evaluate your writing?

Share in the comments below.

The post 3 Cs that Reveal the Quality of Your Blog Post appeared first on Copyblogger.

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Tips and tactics for A/B testing on AngularJS apps

Source http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Widerfunnel/~3/WeWPn1rCw9E/ Reading Time: 8 minutes

Alright, folks, this week we’re getting technical.

This post is geared toward Web Developers who’re working in conversion optimization, specifically those who are testing on AngularJS (or who are trying to test on AngularJS).

Angular, while allowing for more dynamic web applications, presents a problem for optimization on the development side.

It basically throws a wrench in the whole “I’m trying to show you a variation instead of the original webpage without you knowing it’s a variation”-thing for reasons I’ll get into in a minute.

At WiderFunnel, our Dev team has to tackle technical obstacles daily: many different clients means many different frameworks and tools to master.

Recently, the topic of How the heck do you test on Angular came up and Tom Davis, WiderFunnel Front End Developer, was like, “I can help with that.”

So here we go. Here are the tips, tricks, and workarounds we use to test on AngularJS.

Let’s start with the basics:

What is AngularJS?

Angular acts as a Javascript extension to HTML, running in most cases on the client-side (through the browser). Because HTML isn’t a scripting language (it doesn’t run code), it’s limited. Angular allows for more functionality that HTML doesn’t have. It provides a framework to develop apps that are maintainable and extendable, while allowing for features such as single page navigation, rich content, and dynamic functionality.

Note: You can mimic Angular with plain Javascript, however, Angular provides a lot of functionality that a Developer would otherwise have to build themselves.

Why is AngularJS popular?

The real question here is why are JS front-end frameworks and libraries popular? Angular isn’t the only framework you can use, of course: there’s EmberJS, React.js, BackBone etc., and different Developers prefer different frameworks.

But frameworks, in general, are popular because they offer a means of providing a rich user experience that is both responsive and dynamic. Without Angular, a user clicks a button or submits a form on your site, the browser communicates with the server, and the server provides entirely new HTML content that then loads in the browser.

When you’re using Angular, however, a user clicks a button or submits a form and the browser is able to build that content itself, while simultaneously performing server tasks (like database submissions) in the background.

For example, let’s think about form validations.

No Angular:

A user submits a form to create an account on a site. The browser talks to the server and the server says, “There’s a problem. We can’t validate this form because this username already exists.” The server then has to serve up entirely new HTML content and the browser re-renders all of that new content.

This can lead to a laggy, cumbersome user experience, where changes only happen on full page reloads.

With Angular:

A user submits a form to create an account on a site. The browser talks to the server via JSON (a collection of data) and the server says, “There’s a problem. We can’t validate this form because this username already exists.” The browser has already loaded the necessary HTML (on the first load) and then simply fills in the blanks with the data it gets back from the server.

Disclaimer: If you don’t have a basic understanding of web development, the rest of this post may be tough to decipher. There is a Glossary at the end of this post, if you need a quick refresher on certain terms.

Why it can be tricky to test on Angular apps

As mentioned above, Angular acts as an HTML extension. This means that the normal behaviors of the DOM* are being manipulated.

Angular manipulates the DOM using two-way data binding. This means that the content in the DOM is bound to a model. Take a look at the example below:

The class “ng-binding” indicates that the H1 element is bound to a model, in this case $scope.helloWorld. In Angular, model data is referred to in an object called $scope. Any changes to the input field value will change helloWorld in the $scope object. This value is then propagated down to the H1 text.

This means that, if you make any changes to the H1 element through jQuery or native JS, they will essentially be overridden by $scope. This is not good in a test environment: you cannot guarantee that your changes will show up when you intend them to, without breaking the original code.

Laymen’s terms: $scope.helloWorld is bound to the H1 tag, meaning if anything in the variable helloWorld changes, the H1 element will change and vice versa. That’s the power of Angular.

Typically, when you’re testing, you’re making changes to the DOM by injecting Javascript after all of the other content has already loaded.

A developer will wait until the page has loaded, hide the content, change elements in the background, and show everything to the user post-change. (Because the page is hidden while these changes are being made, the user is none-the-wiser.)

We’re trying to do this switcheroo without anyone seeing it.

— Thomas Davis, Front End Developer, WiderFunnel

In Angular apps, there’s no way to guarantee that all of the content has been rendered before that extra Javascript is injected. At this point, Angular has already initialized the app, meaning any code running after this is outside of Angular’s execution context. This makes it complicated to try to figure out when and how to run the changes that make up your test.

When you’re running a test, the changes that make up Variation A (or B or C) are loaded when the page loads. You can only manipulate what’s in the DOM already. If you can’t guarantee that the content is loaded, how do you ensure that your added Javascript runs at the right time and how do you do this without breaking the code and functionality?

Tom explained that, as a dev trying to do conversion optimization on an Angular application, you find yourself constantly trying to answer this question:

How can I make this change without directly affecting my (or my client’s) built-in functionality? In other words, how can I make sure I don’t break this app?

How to influence Angular through the DOM

Angular makes for a complicated testing environment, but there are ways to test on Angular. Here are a few that we use at WiderFunnel (straight from Tom’s mouth to your eyeballs).

Note: In the examples below, we are working in the Inspector. This is just to prove that the changes are happening outside the context of the app and, therefore, an external script would be able to render the same results.

1. Use CSS wherever possible

When you’re running a test on Angular, use CSS whenever possible to make styling changes.

CSS is simply a set of styling rules that the browser applies to matching elements. Styling will always be applied on repaints regardless of how the DOM is bound to Angular. Everytime something changes within the browser, the browser goes through its list of styling rules and reapplies them to the correct element.

Let’s say, in a variation, you want to hide a banner. You can find the element you want to hide and add a styling tag that has an attribute of display none. CSS will always apply this styling and that element will never be displayed.

Of course, you can’t rely on CSS all of the time. It isn’t a scripting language, so you can’t do logic. For instance, CSS can’t say “If [blank] is true, make the element color green. If [blank] is false, make the element color red.”

In other cases, you may want to try $apply.

2. Using $scope/$apply in the DOM

We’ve established that Angular’s two-way data binding makes it difficult to develop consistent page changes outside of the context of Angular. Difficult…but not impossible.

Say you want to change the value of $scope.helloWorld. You need a way to tell Angular, “Hey, a value has changed — you need to propagate this change throughout the app.”

Angular checks $scope variables for changes whenever an event happens. An event attribute like ng-click or ng-model will force Angular to run the Digest Loop*, where a process called dirty checking* is used to update the whole of the app with any new values.

If you want to change the value of $scope.helloWorld and have it propagated throughout the app, you need to trick Angular into thinking an event has occurred.

But, how?

First step: You’ll need to access the model in the $scope object. You can do this simply by querying it in the DOM.

In this example, you’re looking at the $scope object containing all models available to the H1 element. You’re looking at the helloWorld variable exposed.

Once you have access to helloWorld, you can reassign it. But wait! You’ve probably noticed that the text hasn’t changed in the window… That’s because your code is running outside the context of Angular — Angular doesn’t know that a change has actually been made. You need to tell Angular to run the digest loop, which will apply the change within it’s context.

Fortunately, Angular comes equipped with an $apply function, that can force a $digest, as shown below.

3. Watch for changes

This workaround is a little manual, but very important. If the source code changes a variable or calls a function bound to $scope, you’ll need to be able to detect this change in order to keep your test functional.

That’s where Angular’s $watch function comes in. You can use $watch to listen to $scope and provide a callback when changes happen.

In the example below, $watch is listening to $scope.helloWorld. If helloWorld changes, Angular will run a callback that provides the new value and the old value of helloWorld as parameters.

Custom directives and dependency injection

It’s important that you don’t default to writing jQuery when testing on Angular apps. Remember, you have access to all the functionality of Angular, so use it. For complex experiments, you can use custom directives to manage code structure and make it easy to debug.

To do this, you can implement an injector to apply components in the context of the app that you’re testing on. Here’s a simple example that will alert you if your helloWorld variable changes:

For more details on how to use an injector, click here.

—–

These are just a few of the tactics that the WiderFunnel Dev team uses to run successful conversion optimization on Angular apps. That said, we would love to hear from all of you about how you do CRO on Angular!

Do you use the same tactics described here? Do you know of other workarounds not mentioned here? How do you test successfully on Angular apps? Let us know in the comments!

Glossary

DOM: The Document Object Model (DOM) is a cross-platform and language-independent convention for representing and interacting with objects in HTML, XHTML, and XML documents

$scope: Scope is an object that refers to the application model. It is an execution context for expressions. Scopes are arranged in hierarchical structure which mimic the DOM structure of the application. Scopes can watch expressions and propagate events.

$apply: Apply is used to execute an expression in Angular from outside of the Angular framework. (For example from browser DOM events, setTimeout, XHR or third party libraries).

JSON: (JavaScript Object Notation) is a lightweight data-interchange format. It is easy for humans to read and write. It is easy for machines to parse and generate. It is based on a subset of the JavaScript Programming Language, Standard ECMA-262 3rd Edition — December 1999

Two-way data binding: Data-binding in Angular apps is the automatic synchronization of data between the model and view components. The way that Angular implements data-binding allows you to treat the model as the single source of truth in your application.

Digest Loop: There is an internal cycle called $digest that runs through the application and executes watch expressions and compares the value returned with the previous value and if the values do not match then a listener is fired. This $digest cycle keeps looping until no more listeners are fired.

Dirty Checking: Dirty checking is a simple process that boils down to a very basic concept: It checks whether a value has changed that hasn’t yet been synchronized across the app

The post Tips and tactics for A/B testing on AngularJS apps appeared first on WiderFunnel Conversion Optimization.

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